Lost In (Uh, I Mean, “And”) Toronto

lost11.jpgLast night the season finale of LOST aired while the Yankees were playing Toronto. I’m not a Tivo or DVR person, so I flipped back and forth between the two. Bad idea.

I’ve been watching LOST since its beginning but since this season’s episodes began I’ve been “lost” when it comes to understanding the plot. After last night I’m not sure I’ll ever be found.

Why was Ben so upset about Jacob not paying attention to him? (“What about me?”)  What’s the difference between him and Widmark?

Why were there two groups of people looking for Jacob?

Who is Ilana?

Is the ship Jacob was looking at at the beginning of the episode the same one found shiprecked in the jungle seasons ago?

Why is Horace so annoying? 

Why can’t Hurley get more air time?

Will I ever get the answers to these questions? Something tells me I won’t, just as I’ll never find out why the Yankees Retired Numbers are a recurring theme on the show or why Jack and his father trash the Red Sox from time to time. Actually, I read that a few of the LOST writers are big Yankee fans, so perhaps there are no deep, underlying meanings there. Which leads me back to my other questions: perhaps they have no deep, underlying meanings either, which means viewers of LOST will be forever just that. 

For My “Mother” On Mother’s Day

I have one person to thank for my undying love for baseball: My “mother.”

In 1969 when I was 7 years old I was living in Washington, DC with my parents. In March of that year my mother passed away, and my father, a native New Yorker, decided that the best thing for me at that point was to go to New York to live with his sister, Lillian. I did not know Lillian at all. I met her for the first time when she came down to Washington shortly before my mother died. A few weeks later I was in a strange city, about to spend the rest of my formative years with a complete stranger.

Over time, I came to see my aunt as the only true mother I’ve ever had. In fact, I have always called her Ma. But things were very difficult for both of us while she was raising me. Ours was a tenuous relationship to say the least. I won’t go into details. Let’s just say we gave each other hell from the time I moved in until well after I’d moved out as an adult.

There were a few moments when hell disappeared and heaven was a place on earth. One of those moments was when my aunt introduced me to baseball. My aunt grew up in Brooklyn, and when Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier she became a Brooklyn Dodgers fan.

Jackie Robinson Portrait.jpgShe began following baseball in earnest and paid close attention to what Jackie was doing. When he passed away in the early ’70s, I recall her talking about how much of a fan of his she was, saying she followed everything he did, and everything his family did. She spent a lot of time at Ebbets Field, cheering him (and the rest of “dem Bums”) on.

 

Ebbets Field.jpgMy aunt is a woman of faith, and when she felt that she’d replaced God with the Dodgers, she “put away childish things” and stopped following baseball. I’m sure it was a hard thing for her to do, but I suppose it became easier when the the team left Brooklyn for Los Angeles.

So, she stopped following baseball, but it never left her blood. When Willie Mays tried to keep his career alive by playing with the Mets in the early 70s, she turned on a Mets game briefly one day to catch of glimpse of him, perhaps to re-live, for a few moments, the golden age of New York baseball. Then, when Hank Aaron broke Babe Ruth’s home run record, she again turned on the TV, but turned it off after Aaron had broken the record.

She didn’t turn the TV on again until October 1978, when the Yankees and Los Angeles Dodgers were the two teams in the World Series. I don’t really know why, but she was captivated by the series. Suddenly I found myself feeling the same way, and then, “that was all she wrote,” as they say. I became a fan for life.

My aunt didn’t stay captivated. In fact, she rued the day she introduced me to baseball. But I am glad she did. She passed both her love of the game and, more importantly, her faith in God onto me. These two things have sustained me, kept me going during this, the toughest time of my life.

Now my aunt is about to start a new chapter in her life. Her declining health has made it no longer possible for her to live on her own. She will be leaving New York early tomorrow morning to go down south to live with her daughter. This morning she reminded me that God will make a way. Somehow. 

Thank you, Ma, and Happy Mother’s Day.  

Joba Will Always Love His Mom

 

Joba's mom.jpg

Joba Chamberlain will start tonight’s game against the Red Sox (weather permitting) and I’m guessing his Mom will be on his mind. You know why. She was arrested recently on suspicion of selling meth to an undercover agent. According to an article, this is what he said when he found out about the arrest:

“You’ve only got one mom, man, and you’ve got to be thankful for her,” he said. “I still love her.”

I don’t know if Joba really believes this or not, but it’s a great thing to say about his mother. Times can be hard on families these days, as I’m finding out personally, and the best thing a person can do when crises occur is just that: be thankful and still love them.

Lousy Weekends & Stylish Game Days

This past weekend was one to forget. The Yankees got swept by the Red Sox and I got swept away by a family emergency. The emergency began Friday night shortly before Mariano Rivera blew his first save of the season and lasted the entire weekend.

I’m hoping things will stabilize this week, just as I’m hoping the Yankees can put the brakes on this losing streak. Please, please, please! Stop the madness. I want my new radio show to go as planned this coming Sunday night.

I’m really looking forward to doing this show. I have two great guests lined up, including Andrea Claster Greenspan, creator of the Tessuta Game Day Purse:

 

Game Day Purse_Small.jpg

 

Like it? It’s available in the colors and logos of each of the 30 Major League teams. What’s even better is that I’m giving one away on the show Sunday night! Click the link below to find out how to enter for a chance to win it:

Tessuta Game Day Purse Giveaway

So, enter the contest as soon as you can for a chance to win. I’ll have more info on the show in a few days.

Melky Cabrera: Gotta Survive

I missed yesterday’s Yankee game, but I arrived home last night to some wonderful news. My man Melky won the game! Melky Cabrera, the centerfielder Yankee fans love to hate, hit a walk-off homer in the 14th inning.

This is why I love this guy. Yeah, he’s not a five-tool player. He’s not a projected superstar. He’s not “baseball is serious business.” He doesn’t tear his hair out whenever he’s in a hitting slump. He’s just a young player trying to stick in the big leagues and he’s having the time of his life while doing it. As the tune in this video goes, the Melkman knows he’s “gotta survive” and he appears to know how to do it.

Congratulations, Melkman.